Social Media and the Super Bowl: The Thrill of Victory and the Agony of De-Tweet

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Adding this logo to my blog won't help me erase the bad memories of Super Bowl Sunday.

Well that sucked.

My beloved Pittsburgh Steelers lost the Super Bowl. It hurts to type it. Hats off to the Green Bay Packers, whose fans – many of whom I count as good friends – were very kind to me on Facebook, Twitter (and in person) following the game. 

And even though I offered in-game tweeting tips in my last blog post, I found myself too nervous, too into the action – to do the Super Bowl tweet thing. I managed a few meager posts on Twitter and one on Facebook, riding a black-and-gold wave of emotion from quarter to quarter.

I was watching both, though, which got me thinking that the Super Bowl really is the ultimate combination of social media and sports. Not just because of its importance to the sports world – yes, the Super Bowl is the most important, most-watched, most-hyped sporting event around. But the Big Game also combines music, pop culture, celebrity – and this year even politics.

So Twitter and Facebook accounts across the globe were humming with activity on Super Bowl Sunday. Inbetween comments about action on the field, there were just as many – and probably more – pithy, snarky, humorous and tasteless ones about the newest round of Super Bowl commercials, the botched National Anthem and the, ahem, interesting half-time show.

Even for a sports nut like me, it was hard to take my eyes off Twitter to watch the action on TV. There was just as much entertainment flashing on my 4-inch Mesmerize as on the 50-inch plasma. It was surreal to see so much activity in two places at once.

Green Bay Packer fans are fancy on the Tweeters.

After the game, Green Bay Packer fans plastered their Twitter timelines and Facebook Walls with an assortment of woo-hoos and digital high-fives. Pittsburgh Steelers fans consoled and cried with each other, wondering out loud what might have been.

I went to bed.

But I wanted to read more, and first thing Monday morning I was back on Twitter and Facebook in search of the social highlights. I’m not the first to accuse our society of an obsession with technololgy. We (I) have a love affair with smart phones, and TV has become that third wheel, creating awkward moments when we become so engrossed with the social, we forget about the live action.  

Those Generation Y-ers (all you 18-28 year-olds out there) are mostly to blame, spending more time online than in front of the TV. A whopping 42 percent were watching online video at least once per month, according to a 2008 BusinessWeek report. It’s only grown since then I’m sure, and Gen-Xers are catching up fast.

For social media, it means integration with TV, eventually combining one into some usable format that can go with us but be there when we’re home. I’m sure somebody a lot smarter than me is already creating such a device. And that’s good news for sports fans like me who are hooked on social media.

Especially if my Steelers are playing.

Thanks for being a fan.

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4 thoughts on “Social Media and the Super Bowl: The Thrill of Victory and the Agony of De-Tweet

  1. I thought it was telling that when they panned the camera to John Madden and George Bush, they were both texting. Two people who I thought would be most technologically challenged, at one of the biggest sporting events in the world, and they’re checking to see if they have any messages.

  2. Tammy Luke

    Amen Buchheim! (that was seriously nauseating). I too thought it was hilarious that the old geezers were texting during the Super Bowl! I know that the game in and of itself is pretty slow considering all the interruptions, but for pete’s sake – go schmooze!

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